Flash ficlet!!

Dec. 22nd, 2014 09:09 pm
china_shop: Neal, Peter and Elizabeth smiling (WC - OT3 smiles)
[personal profile] china_shop
Wheeee, I just wrote a thing for the first time since AUGUST (omg!), for the amnesty on [community profile] fan_flashworks:

When it's hard to say anything (say goodbye)
~1000 words, OT3ish gen, White Collar, SPOILERS FOR 6.06.

An alternate ending. (Did I mention spoilers?)
[syndicated profile] zarhooie_tumblr_feed




"At one stage Elrond was actually gonna visit Lothlórien and talk directly to Galadriel. But once it was decided that Arwen would not go to Lothlórien and Helm’s Deep, that scene had to be reworked." - Jabez Olssen (Additional Editor) (x)

[syndicated profile] zarhooie_tumblr_feed


laireshi:

voteforvoldemort:

Reminder that Tony Stark decorated the apartment he gave Peter with a huge picture of Steve Rogers.

…is there any house that Tony bought that isn’t decorated with huge pictures of Steve?

[syndicated profile] zarhooie_tumblr_feed

madhatterin221b:

iamspacetoast:

vicesandvessel:

madhatterin221b:

'girls don't have to clear their internet history'

let me explain you a thing

of course girls don’t have to clear their internet history
girls are smart enough to use an incognito window

I garuntre you 60% of people in general let alone girls don’t know how to use an incognito window

do you. do you garuntre me.

If you use anything other than incognito, you are making things waaaaaaay more difficult than they ought to be. I was going to say harder for yourself, but, well, not being hard is kind of the problem, eh?

Yuletide 2013 recs

Dec. 22nd, 2014 12:59 am
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
[personal profile] kate_nepveu

I'm getting my Yuletide recs up early this year! . . . by which I mean earlier than last year, by a whole two days. (Well, it was the 21st before I started reworking my organization scheme on the fly and His Pipliness needed soothing back to sleep, twice. Close enough.) But these are still recs for last year's Yuletide.

Despite the timing, these are all pre-reveal recs: I clipped everything that looked vaguely interesting into Evernote and read it that way, with "anonymous" listed as every author. (In fact I am cutting and pasting so fast now that I am not even registering the author half the time . . . ) There are 59 of these, if my tag count in Evernote is correct, so they are broken down into cut-tagged categories for your convenience; there are headers inside that match the cut-tags for skimming purposes. I am sorry for the lack of detailed discussion, but I hope the headers and my comments give you an idea of whether you want to read the story anyway. Feel free to comment if you'd like more information.

Anime & Movies: Brave, Disney Princesses, E.T., Galaxy Quest, Out of Sight, The Princess Bride, Princess Tutu (2) )

TV: Endeavour, Elementary (4), Fraggle Rock, The Middleman (4), Twin Peaks )

Books: Code Name Verity, Cotillion, Doctrine of Labyrinths, Emelan (Circle series) (2), Five Hundred Kingdoms, Gentleman Bastards (2) )

Books: Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2), Lady's Not for Burning, Lymond Chronicles (2), Mageworlds, Mary Russell )

Books: Miss Marple, Nero Wolfe, The Outsiders, Pern, Queen's Thief, Rivers of London (3), Robot (Asimov) )

Books: Temeraire, Time Traveller's Guide to Medieval England, Tortall (Immortals), The Westing Game (3), The Wheel of Time, Young Wizards )

Comics: A-Babies v. X-Babies, Batwoman, Calvin & Hobbes (2), Gunnerkrigg Court )

Miscellaneous: A Dark Room (game), 'Jolene' (song), Minesweeper, Space Vehicles anthropomorphic )

Multi-crossover: Gravity + various )

Remember, if you like a story, please at least hit "kudos," or leave a comment if you can! No need for an AO3 account.

(no subject)

Dec. 21st, 2014 09:21 pm
taennyn: (come back another day)
[personal profile] taennyn
I can be strangely easy to discourage posting. Anybody got anything they'd like me to babble about?

(no subject)

Dec. 21st, 2014 10:59 pm
bilqis: black woman dressed in blue in a tree (Default)
[personal profile] bilqis
black and white close up of pencil tips with the words Inking It Out, write 75000 words or more in 2015, inkingitout.dreamwidth.org

Challenge yourself to write 75000 words or more in 2015!

[community profile] inkingitout [community profile] inkingitout [community profile] inkingitout

Sign ups now open!
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Fundamentally, if you want to make a community hospitable,* you need to work not just on individual rules of conduct, but on governance. This is because

  1. the particular people implementing rules of conduct will use their judgment in when, whether, and how to apply those rules, and
  2. you may need to go a few levels up and change not just who's implementing rules, but who's allowed to make rules in the first place

Wait, how does that work?

In my Wiki Conference 2014 keynote address (available in text, audio, and video), and in my PyCon 2014 poster about Hacker School, I discuss how to make your community hospitable. In those pieces I also mention how the gatekeeping (there is an initiation/selection process) and the paid labor of community managers (the facilitators) at Hacker School help prevent or mitigate bad behavior. And, of course, the Hacker School user manual is the canonical document about what is desired and prohibited at Hacker School; "Subtle -isms at Hacker School" and "Negative comments" have more ruminations on how certain kinds of negativity create a bad learning environment.

Sometimes it's the little stuff, more subtle than the booth babe/groping/assault/slur kind of stuff, that makes a community feel inhospitable to me. When I say "little stuff" I am trying to describe the small ways people marginalize each other but that I did not experience at Hacker School and thus that I noticed more after my sabbatical at Hacker School: dominance displays, cruelty in the guise of honesty, the use of power in inhospitable ways, feeling unvalued, "jokes", clubbiness, watching my every public action for ungenerous interpretation, nitpicking, and bad faith.

You can try to make rules about how things ought to be, about what is allowed and not, but members of the incumbent/dominant group are less accustomed to monitoring their own behavior, as the Onlinesmanship wiki (for community moderators) reminds us:

Another pattern of the privileged: not keeping track of the line between acceptable and unacceptable behavior. They only know they've crossed the line when someone in authority tells them so. If this doesn't happen, their behavior stays bad or gets worse....

Do not argue about their intentions. They'll swear they meant no harm, then sulk like fury because you even suggested it. In most cases they'll be telling the truth: the possibility that they were giving offense never crossed their minds. Neither did any other scenario, because unlike real adults, they take no responsibility for getting along with others. The idea that in a cooperative work situation, getting along with one's fellow employees is part of the job, is not in their worldview.

This too is a function of privilege. They assume they won't get hit with full penalties for their first offense (or half-dozen offenses), and that other people will always take on the work of tracking their behavior, warning them when they go over the line, and explaining over and over again what they should have done and why. It's the flip side of the way people of the marked state get hit with premature negative judgements (stupid, dishonest, sneaky, hysterically oversensitive) on the basis of little or no evidence.

And, in any community, rules often get much more leniently interpreted for members of the dominant group. And this is even harder to fight against when influential people believe that no marginalization is taking place; as Abi Sutherland articulates: "The problem with being lower on an unstated social hierarchy is that marginal judgment calls will reliably go against you. It's an excusable form of reinforcement."**

Changing individual rules isn't enough. After all, individual rules get made by particular humans, who -- here, instead of babbling about social rule system theory at you, I'll give you a sort of sidebar about three successive levels of governance, courtesy of my bachelor's degree in political science:***

Actors: The actual set of people who run an organization or who shape agendas, on any given day, have particular ideas and policies and try to get certain things done. They implement and set and change regulations. Actors turn over pretty fast.
For example, in its five-year history, Hacker School has had employees come and go, and new participants have become influential alumni.
Dominant worldviews: More deeply and less ephemerally, the general worldview of the group of people who have power and influence (e.g., Democrats in the executive branch of the US government, sexists in mass media, surgeons in operating rooms, deletionists on English Wikipedia) determines what's desirable and what's possible in the long term. Churn is slower on this level.
For example, dominant worldviews among Hacker Schoolers**** include: diversity of Hacker Schoolers, on several axes, helps everyone learn more. Hiding your work, impostor syndrome, too much task-switching, and the extrinsic motivation of job-hunting are common problems that reduce the chances of Hacker Schoolers' success. Careers in the tech industry are, on balance, desirable.
Rules of the game: What is sacred? What is so core to our identity, our values, that breaking one of these means you're not one of us? The rules of the game (e.g., how we choose leaders, what the rulers' jurisdiction is) confer legitimacy on the whole process. Breaking these rules is heresy and amending them is very hard and controversial.***** Publicly disagreeing with the rules of the game costs lots of political capital.
For example, the rules of the game among Hacker Schoolers, as I see them, include: the founders of Hacker School and their employees have legitimate authority over admissions, hiring, and rule enforcement. Hacker School is (moneywise) free to attend. Admission is selective. A well-designed environment that helps people do the right thing automatically is better than one-on-one persuasion, which is still better than coercion.

(Where do the four Hacker School social rules fall in this framework? I don't know. Hacker School's founders encourage an experimental spirit, and I think they would rather stay fluid than accrete more and more sacred texts. But, as more and more participants have experienced a Hacker School with the four social rules as currently constituted, I bet a ton of my peers perceive the social rules as DNA at this point, inherent and permanent. I'm not far from that myself.)

(I regret that I don't have the citation to hand, and would welcome the name of the theorists who created this model.)

So, if you want a hospitable community, it's not enough to set up a code of conduct; a CoC can't substitute for culture. Assuming you're working with a pre-existing condition, you have to assess the existing power structures and see where you have leverage, so you can articulate and advocate new worldviews, and maybe even move to amend the rules of the game.

How do you start? This post has already gotten huge, so, I'll talk about that next time.


* I assume that we can't optimize every community or activity for hospitality and learning. Every collaborative effort has to balance execution and alignment; once in a while, people who have already attained mastery of skill x just need to mind-meld to get something done. But if we want to attract, retain, and grow people, we need to always consider the pathway to inclusion. And that means, when we accept behavior or norms that make it harder for people to learn, we should know that we're doing it, and ask whether that's what we want. We should check.

**See the second half of "One Way Confidence Will Look" for more on the unwillingness to see bias.

*** I am quite grateful for my political science background -- not least because I learned that socially constructed things are real too, which many computer science-focused people in my field seem to have missed, which means they can't mod or make new social constructs as easily. Requisite variety.

**** A non-comprehensive list, of course. And I don't feel equal to the more nuanced question: what beliefs do the most influential Hacker Schoolers hold, especially on topics where their worldview is substantially different from their peers'?

***** The US has a very demanding procedure for amending the Constitution. India doesn't. The US has had 27 amendments in 227 years; India, 98 in 67 years. I don't know how to interpret that.

Heliodrax: Private Caches

Dec. 21st, 2014 08:42 pm
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Heliodrax: Hidden Caches

The Heliodrax are aware that the Libraries are not a perfect system for collection, or preservation. (Nothing is.)

As a purely secular “Giftmas” present to anyone who wishes to write in this universe, you may list and conceal a cache of ten “books” -or scrolls, manuscripts, small artwork in any modestly permanent medium, sized no larger than a foot across by a foot high, approximately 1 1/2- 2” thick (35 cm X 35cm X 5cm) – for storytelling purposes.

For example:

{} Any of the Incan texts burned by the Spanish priests in the New World. It doesn't matter what it /is/; the sheer catastrophic loss makes my heart hurt whenever I think of it.

{} Any of the scrolls lost from the Library at Alexandria, for much the same reason. Plus, there are /so many/ hinted works which later scholars referred to in the “of course you've read” presumptive tone which makes me wonder exactly how large a scholar's library /was/ in a middle-sized Greek, Roman or Egyptian outpost.

{} A copy, as perfectly reproduced as I could manage, of the handwritten Jefferson Bible. Why? Because my stepfather was a minister, and /that/ facsimile version was one he never managed to add to his library.

{} A particular, secondhand paperback copy of “The Arm of the Starfish” by Madeleine L'Engle. The notes and comments scribbled in the margins affected me quite deeply for many years, every /single/ time I picked it up to re-read.

I could go on for hours, simply trying to whittle infinity down to a collection of ten representative items.

What would you include in your cache, and why? Those answers, in turn, tell others what kind of Heliodrax amassed the cache. (Mine... “a magpie on some kind of attention-fractionating chemical? Or... addicted to the color blue? Really... there's no way to tell!”)

Caches exactly like these /are/ often (but not universally) amassed by individual Heliodrax as they prepare for their last Transition, not as a rite of passage, but as a sort of private memory chest. The practical would include an early copywork, or things which encapsulate their years of study to date, while the whimsical or sentimental might include the same work for very different reasons.

Many of these are returned to the individual's home library when a Family is formed, and when the Family separates, they are packed away as 'ordinary' items. Few Heliodrax seem to /need/ a hidden treasure box, but for those who do, being entrusted with the secret of its existence is deeply intimate, a show of enormous trust. Because these choices are so revealing of the collector's mindset.

I have no doubt that the vast majority of my readers are bibliophiles already able to list off at least three items believed lost to history which “somehow” found their way, even as copies, into the World Archive, or, more secretively, into a private cache. I have to remind /myself/ that too many of these 'miraculously' recovered items would irrevocably change the parallel world into something almost entirely unrecognizable to our current society. This wouldn't necessarily be a /bad/ thing, but it would certainly be beyond my current abilities to organize and keep track of a dozen different parallel universes at once.

Just think... if only a hundred of these caches still exist in 2015, what would happen If they were unearthed by a curious human?

Happy Birthday!

Dec. 21st, 2014 11:40 pm
settiai: (Rose -- recklesslove)
[personal profile] settiai
Happy belated birthday, [personal profile] holli, [livejournal.com profile] lozenger8, and [livejournal.com profile] velociraptor52!

And happy birthday, [personal profile] aralias, [livejournal.com profile] _bettina_, and [livejournal.com profile] mmichelle!
archangelbeth: Woman doing a zombie "braaaaains" pose (Braaains!)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
Despite the lure of Dragon Cage Rare Drop Breed from combat. *facepalm*

And despite the headache.

Havva Quote
Alice: You've gotta be more daring. It's good for you to take a risk!
Warrick: Says the lady who can drink egg nog without dying.
--http://namesakecomic.com/comic/gift-of-the-fairy-tree-part-1/


INwatch+Bookwatch )
Adopt one today!
Dragons under fold )

To-Do List

Dec. 21st, 2014 11:20 pm
settiai: (Mordin -- bleeding_muse)
[personal profile] settiai
Feel free to ignore. )
[syndicated profile] sumana_feed
Fundamentally, if you want to make a community hospitable,* you need to work not just on individual rules of conduct, but on governance. This is because

  1. the particular people implementing rules of conduct will use their judgment in when, whether, and how to apply those rules, and
  2. you may need to go a few levels up and change not just who's implementing rules, but who's allowed to make rules in the first place

Wait, how does that work?

In my Wiki Conference 2014 keynote address (available in text, audio, and video), and in my PyCon 2014 poster about Hacker School, I discuss how to make your community hospitable. In those pieces I also mention how the gatekeeping (there is an initiation/selection process) and the paid labor of community managers (the facilitators) at Hacker School help prevent or mitigate bad behavior. And, of course, the Hacker School user manual is the canonical document about what is desired and prohibited at Hacker School; "Subtle -isms at Hacker School" and "Negative comments" have more ruminations on how certain kinds of negativity create a bad learning environment.

Sometimes it's the little stuff, more subtle than the booth babe/groping/assault/slur kind of stuff, that makes a community feel inhospitable to me. When I say "little stuff" I am trying to describe the small ways people marginalize each other but that I did not experience at Hacker School and thus that I noticed more after my sabbatical at Hacker School: dominance displays, cruelty in the guise of honesty, the use of power in inhospitable ways, feeling unvalued, "jokes", clubbiness, watching my every public action for ungenerous interpretation, nitpicking, and bad faith.

You can try to make rules about how things ought to be, about what is allowed and not, but members of the incumbent/dominant group are less accustomed to monitoring their own behavior, as the Onlinesmanship wiki (for community moderators) reminds us:

Another pattern of the privileged: not keeping track of the line between acceptable and unacceptable behavior. They only know they've crossed the line when someone in authority tells them so. If this doesn't happen, their behavior stays bad or gets worse....

Do not argue about their intentions. They'll swear they meant no harm, then sulk like fury because you even suggested it. In most cases they'll be telling the truth: the possibility that they were giving offense never crossed their minds. Neither did any other scenario, because unlike real adults, they take no responsibility for getting along with others. The idea that in a cooperative work situation, getting along with one's fellow employees is part of the job, is not in their worldview.

This too is a function of privilege. They assume they won't get hit with full penalties for their first offense (or half-dozen offenses), and that other people will always take on the work of tracking their behavior, warning them when they go over the line, and explaining over and over again what they should have done and why. It's the flip side of the way people of the marked state get hit with premature negative judgements (stupid, dishonest, sneaky, hysterically oversensitive) on the basis of little or no evidence.

And, in any community, rules often get much more leniently interpreted for members of the dominant group. And this is even harder to fight against when influential people believe that no marginalization is taking place; as Abi Sutherland articulates: "The problem with being lower on an unstated social hierarchy is that marginal judgment calls will reliably go against you. It's an excusable form of reinforcement."**

Changing individual rules isn't enough. After all, individual rules get made by particular humans, who -- here, instead of babbling about social rule system theory at you, I'll give you a sort of sidebar about three successive levels of governance, courtesy of my bachelor's degree in political science:***

Actors: The actual set of people who run an organization or who shape agendas, on any given day, have particular ideas and policies and try to get certain things done. They implement and set and change regulations. Actors turn over pretty fast.
For example, in its five-year history, Hacker School has had employees come and go, and new participants have become influential alumni.
Dominant worldviews: More deeply and less ephemerally, the general worldview of the group of people who have power and influence (e.g., Democrats in the executive branch of the US government, sexists in mass media, surgeons in operating rooms, deletionists on English Wikipedia) determines what's desirable and what's possible in the long term. Churn is slower on this level.
For example, dominant worldviews among Hacker Schoolers**** include: diversity of Hacker Schoolers, on several axes, helps everyone learn more. Hiding your work, impostor syndrome, too much task-switching, and the extrinsic motivation of job-hunting are common problems that reduce the chances of Hacker Schoolers' success. Careers in the tech industry are, on balance, desirable.
Rules of the game: What is sacred? What is so core to our identity, our values, that breaking one of these means you're not one of us? The rules of the game (e.g., how we choose leaders, what the rulers' jurisdiction is) confer legitimacy on the whole process. Breaking these rules is heresy and amending them is very hard and controversial.***** Publicly disagreeing with the rules of the game costs lots of political capital.
For example, the rules of the game among Hacker Schoolers, as I see them, include: the founders of Hacker School and their employees have legitimate authority over admissions, hiring, and rule enforcement. Hacker School is (moneywise) free to attend. Admission is selective. A well-designed environment that helps people do the right thing automatically is better than one-on-one persuasion, which is still better than coercion.

(Where do the four Hacker School social rules fall in this framework? I don't know. Hacker School's founders encourage an experimental spirit, and I think they would rather stay fluid than accrete more and more sacred texts. But, as more and more participants have experienced a Hacker School with the four social rules as currently constituted, I bet a ton of my peers perceive the social rules as DNA at this point, inherent and permanent. I'm not far from that myself.)

(I regret that I don't have the citation to hand, and would welcome the name of the theorists who created this model.)

So, if you want a hospitable community, it's not enough to set up a code of conduct; a CoC can't substitute for culture. You have to assess the existing power structures and see where you have leverage, so you can articulate and advocate new worldviews, and maybe even move to amend the rules of the game.

How do you start? This post has already gotten huge, so, I'll talk about that next time.


* I assume that we can't optimize every community or activity for hospitality and learning. Every collaborative effort has to balance execution and alignment; once in a while, people who have already attained mastery of skill x just need to mind-meld to get something done. But if we want to attract, retain, and grow people, we need to always consider the pathway to inclusion. And that means, when we accept behavior or norms that make it harder for people to learn, we should know that we're doing it, and ask whether that's what we want. We should check.

**See the second half of "One Way Confidence Will Look" for more on the unwillingness to see bias.

*** I am quite grateful for my political science background -- not least because I learned that socially constructed things are real too, which many computer science-focused people in my field seem to have missed, which means they can't mod or make new social constructs as easily. Requisite variety.

**** A non-comprehensive list, of course. And I don't feel equal to the more nuanced question: what beliefs do the most influential Hacker Schoolers hold, especially on topics where their worldview is substantially different from their peers'?

***** The US has a very demanding procedure for amending the Constitution. India doesn't. The US has had 27 amendments in 227 years; India, 98 in 67 years. I don't know how to interpret that.

Missing the woods and the trees

Dec. 22nd, 2014 03:36 am
[syndicated profile] india_together_feed

Posted by Darryl D'Monte


Ever since the report of the Subramanian Committee, set up to review and amend key environmental legislation, was leaked, several questions have been raised regarding its real implications for the environment. Darryl D’Monte explains some of the most critical concerns.                                  

Korrasami: I ship it

Dec. 21st, 2014 07:30 pm
annathepiper: (Path of Wisdom)
[personal profile] annathepiper

My household was beyond delighted with the finale of Avatar: The Legend of Korra this weekend. Along with a great deal of the rest of the Internet, we were specifically delighted by the ending.

Dara’s been monitoring the Korrasami explosion on tumblr all weekend, which has been a delight to behold. Not so much of a delight is the fight Dara’s been having to wage on Wikipedia to get the Korrasami ending acknowledged–because while a lot of the fandom is in favor of it, there are those who are stridently against it as well.

Which makes me sad. It makes me sad as well that the creators couldn’t come right out and explicitly declare that Korra and Asami had feelings for each other. But it should surprise none of you that I’m in favor of it. Others all over the Net have called out how the show went as close to outright stating as they could.

For example, with the framing of Korra and Asami in a way that’s noticeably similar to various established het couples in this season.

Couples on Korra

Couples on Korra

Or how the music they played over that final scene is the same piece they used in Airbender when Aang and Katara declared their feelings for each other: a thing called, in fact, “The Avatar’s Love”.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: representation matters. I grant you, I’m coming at this with a bisexual worldview, and so it seems pretty damned apparent to me that this storyline’s intent is that Korra and Asami became a couple. But what looks like representation to me unfortunately is not as obvious to people who aren’t specifically hoping for that kind of a resolution–and worse, those for whom same-sex relationships are outright objectionable are bound and determined to go LALALALALALA I CAN’T HEAR YOU. The fight Dara’s having on Wikipedia had the other person eventually state that they wouldn’t take anything short of a statement by the creators of the show as to what was intended.

A statement that, I note, would not be demanded if that final scene had involved Mako instead of Asami. I doubt anybody who saw the finale would have doubted for an instant that that was a romantic resolution if Mako had been involved.

As for me? I choose to believe that Asami and Korra are now going to have a delightful and romantic sojourn in the spirit world, and perhaps Uncle Iroh will officiate their marriage. Because I mean, honestly, people, how is this not a romantic scene?

Korra and Asami

Korra and Asami

Also, I’d just like to say that even aside from the Korrasami ending, the whole season has been a delight. I really appreciated the character development on Korra’s part, and even aside from the rough schedule imposed on the show by Nickelodeon, I feel that seasons 3 and 4 were both very strong storytelling. And the finale in particular was deeply satisfying, and a hell of a strong note to end on.

I really, really hope we’ll get to continue to visit Korra’s world courtesy of the Avatar comics Dark Horse has been putting out. They’ve been doing excellent stories featuring Aang’s cast, and I would buy stories featuring further adventures with the Korra cast in a heartbeat.

Here are further links to discussion elsewhere:

On io9: My Thoughts On Korra’s Schrodinger Relationship Status

On the Mary Sue: On That Legend of Korra Ending Scene & The Desire For Explicit Representation and MegaRecap of Our Favorite Moments from The Legend of Korra Finale!

Mirrored from angelahighland.com.

(no subject)

Dec. 21st, 2014 09:53 pm
thistlerose: (seasonal: winter)
[personal profile] thistlerose
I didn't get to go on my hike yesterday because I'm still having stomach issues. I got about halfway to the mountain, then decided that it would be really stupid if I got sick while climbing and had to be taken care of by people who don't really know me that well. So I went home, called the doctor's office, and talked to a nurse. She said it sounds like some kind of acid thing, so she told me which pills to buy. And, actually, they've helped. It's not perfect, but it's better. I'm seeing the doctor tomorrow, but I have a feeling I'll live. And get to eat without trepidation! I really, really love food. (OMG, I made latke waffles tonight. They're latkes, but they're also waffles! They're not fried, so they're somewhat more healthful ... though I just realized that the fact that they're not fried probably means they're not really appropriate Chanukah food. Oh, well.)

Even though I didn't hike, I walked four miles yesterday and two today, so that's something.

_____

I'm trying to finish at least one Yuletide treat before I head down to NY on Tuesday. I have three gifts waiting for me, but I've only posted one story myself. I'm hoping I'll be able to crank out one more treat before Christmas, but we'll see. There are some good prompts, but most of them deserve more time than I've got.

_____

My dad doesn't like The Lord of the Rings, and listening to him talk about it cracks me up. I told him I was going to see the last Hobbit film with my cousins on Sunday.

Dad: "What are these movies? I don't get them. There are little people, and then there are bigger people, and then I guess there are warriors or something. And they're always fighting. The fighting never stops. What are they fighting for???"

Me: "The One Ring! Good vs. Evil!"

Dad: "WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN."

My dad doesn't like war movies. Any war. Or movies about the Holocaust. Or movies about slavery. He feels that the sheer horror of these things can never be truthfully conveyed by movies, so they shouldn't even try. I get what he's saying, though I don't agree. Anyway. He's the only person I know who just. doesn't. like. hobbits. *facepalm*

Previously On

Dec. 21st, 2014 10:20 pm
colls: (SPN Winchesters2)
[personal profile] colls posting in [community profile] tv_talk


Hello [community profile] tv_talk!

Our weekly opportunity to chat about non-current TV. Anything goes! Please stop by and tell us what you're watching, what you've been thinking of checking out, etc. Closed canons or something currently airing that you're just behind on -- it's all good. :)

Some possible topics:
- What show(s) have you watched this week?
- What are some of your favorite comedies from the past?



It's been fun hosting the 'Previously On' posts - thank you for all the conversations!! I hope you have a wonderful holiday season and a very happy new year!!!

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